Eleonora de Sabata is a journalist and author of articles, investigations, books, exhibitions and documentaries published around the world.

She is also a consultant on Mediterranean stories for International media, having worked with the BBC, Discovery Channel, the National 
Geographic magazine and Blue Planet.

For the Financial Times she investigated mafia connections with illegal fishing, off-shore oil&gas explorations, sinking of "toxic" ships and the Costa Concordia cruise ship disaster.

 

She has planned and developed several exhibitions on sharks, tuna and marine litter. 

She wrote and developed a series of children books for distinguished De Agostini publishing company, translated in three languages

Eleonora is a member of the Italian order of reporters, of the Italian Society of Marine Biology, of the Italian Association of Underwater Scientific Operators and Nikon Professional Service.

Based on almost 30 years of experience of the Mediterranean marine environment, the extensive networks of contacts amongst the different publics within the marine world, and her skills with traditional

and new media, she is a communication consultant for International environmental associations, Universities and institutes on marine research projects.

 

She manages research projects on sharks and other endangered species with MedSharks, a research and conservation organisation, where she is currently President. 

Her studies, published on International, peer-reviewed journals, are funded by European projects (LIFE), the Fondation Prince Albert II de Monaco, Project Aware, the Save Our Seas Foundation (read my Mermaid's Purse project) and other private sponsors.

 

She collected a new species of shell on the offshore banks in the Straits of Sicily, which was given her name:Jujubinus eleonorae. Another species, Alvania desabatae, was discovered through her citizen science project Osservatorio Mediterraneo.

She currently is the communication manager of the EU-funded Clean Sea Life project, an awareness campaign on marine litter